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You can help babies grow

The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Sault Area Hospital is a special place for babies who need extra attention. These are babies who may have been born sooner or sicker than expected. Multiples – like twins. Newborns with jaundice, or breathing issues. Our littlest patients who need support to grow and get well enough to go home with their family.


Of the approximately 800 babies born at Sault Area Hospital each year, about 15% (120 of them) will need extra care in the NICU.


The NICU relies on state-of-the-art medical technology. Specialized beds, called "incubators" or "isolettes," provide a controlled environment for these brand new babies. These cozy quarters mimic the womb, managing temperature, humidity, and oxygen levels. For premature babies, these special beds are critical: without them, they would spend all their energy to stay warm instead of growing bigger and stronger.


The warm environment also means babies can stay in just a diaper, instead of a swaddle. This lets care providers see the babies' bellies, which can tell them things about a baby's breathing or digestion. Being able to see the baby clearly helps our care teams notice problems right away, and intervene quickly.


Isolettes offer easy access for care teams to watch and care for babies around the clock. They also protect vulnerable preemies from being exposed to airborne viruses and infections. During outbreaks and flu season, this helps keep babies safe, and give their family peace of mind.


These isolettes also have special doors that can open for care teams and loved ones to reach in and touch the baby. This lets our nurses and doctors easily check on baby provide treatment without taking them out of the isolette.


Sault Area Hospital has 8 infant isolettes, and has started to replace them as they are now 10+ years old. Your support can help us bring new isolettes to the NICU to help hundreds of babies over the next decade.

 

Your donation can help our smallest patients grow.



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